Flock.

Let’s be like herded sheep, shall we?

and stand in line for centuries,

like in mind to the dullest ancestries,

let’s evolve without changing anything…

now, we all line up without questioning,

spend money on shit that has no meaning,

nothing to show have we “sentient beings”,

besides the bombs we can blow atomically…

we watch the World News from home on TV,

bump our gums about what we’d do differently,

but at the end of the day, that logic is shifty,

coming from a cesspool of such inactivity…

Let’s line up overnight to see a premièring movie,

then trample each other with the doors’ opening,

we each do what we like without ever considering,

how the rest of the sheep want other sheep things…

and sadly things will only become more trifling,

because sheep are too stupid to know anything,

unable to think on one’s stand-alone feet,

we are all doomed ‘til we stop acting like sheep.

Ancient Proverbs: 19 – The Arapaho.

“With all things and in all things, we are relatives.”

~ Arapaho Proverb (Native American)

alive

I chose today’s proverb simply because it chose to grab me when I came across it in a book about Colonial times in the US. I know I am not the only one who has noted the trends amongst native leaders during those times to urge unity and humanity in the face of life-altering impositions and strife; and the above quote is just another example of the tribal tendency to relate with a stranger who is fundamentally different.

Goosebumps.

occupy_trinityWhen I first saw this, it gave me goosebumps for some reason…I love it love it love it…a very strong and thought-provoking image to my heart and spirit.

Ancient Proverbs: 5 – Shawnee Wisdom.

“All who have died were created equal.”

~The Shawnee

shawnee folk depiction 1850s

The Shawnee are another one of the oldest and most well established Native tribes in the US; it is also my own tribe. The Shawnee have rooted themselves deeply, along with other tribes (such as the Iroquois) all along the ranges of our continent, all the way up to Inuit territory near Alaska. They were widely forced to assimilate with the Cherokee Nation during the colonial days of settlement and widespread disease out of a sheer desperation to survive as a tribe. Tecumseh was a historically recognized Shawnee Native leader of the tribes during times of severe unrest and civil war.

tecumseh2

Ancient Proverbs: 3 – Navajo Wisdom.

You can’t wake a person who is pretending to be asleep.” –Navajo Proverb

The Navajo, or Naabeehó

This tribal population likely makes up the most diverse tribe in modern day US; they originally hail from the Southwestern United States, and are the largest federally recognized tribe of the United States of America (with over 300,000 enrolled members).

Notable Ancient Proverbs: 1 – Puebloan Wisdom.

Hold on to what is good,
even if it’s a handful of earth.

Hold on to what you believe,
even if it’s a tree that stands by itself.

Hold on to what you must do,
even if it’s a long way from here.

Hold on to your life,
even if it’s easier to let go.

Hold on to my hand,
even if someday I’ll be gone away from you.

(Excerpted from a Pueblo Prayer)

MesaVerde

The Ancestral Puebloans are said to be the oldest Native Americans known to date; their technologically advanced civilization (i.e. canals, rivers and roadways) were able to miraculously thrive in the deserts of Utah, New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado during the “Early Basketmaker II Era”. They are also historically referred to as the Anasazi (a derogatory Navajo Term meaning ‘ancient enemy’) .

“No Donner-for-Dinner Day”

Stand Back Up Again.

Stand Back Up Again.

As our super-horribly-awful holiday known as Valentine’s Day draws nearer:

Okay so a lot of you may be offended by my concept and I truly apologize to anyone who takes offense at my attempt to kill two birds with the one stone…but:

Instead of Valentine’s Day on February 14, I suggest that February 19 become National “No Donner for Dinner Day” in celebration of the long-overdue rescue efforts made by Californians to get the Donner Party to safety from the Pass.

I really dislike the concept of Valentine’s Day and always have – not sure why besides the fact that it’s just flat-out dumb in my opinion. St. Valentine was executed by the Pope in return for his defiance of the catholic marriage laws, his story is nowhere near “romantic”.

NOTE: I realize that not everyone made it out alive and I am in no way making light of the tragedy surrounding this bit of humor; but I do, however – feel that if we are going to demand a holiday for every month and need one for February, it should be something worthy of a National Holiday, for Christ sake…I mean, when was the last time anybody wrote a biography on Cupid or even the good Saint, for that matter?…some guy from medieval Europe celebrated as an American holiday, really? It’s just not worthy.

The rescue of the surviving members of such a horrific, VERY American historical tragedy is quite worthy as a celebratory memorial holiday, in my opinion. I mean, can you imagine anything better to celebrate besides the Donner Party (as well as several attachment families and various individual travelers) exiting a winter-long living, freezing, starving Hell. The losses of these people were difficult to comprehend from my warm bedroom in sunny Nor-Cal, but I know that at least one of the survivors one time made the statement in an interview with a reporter that he’d preferred to have died up on the Pass in the snow with his brother…a statement that gives one pause to think a little longer about the endurance of those who came down the Pass and carried on with life afterward.