(Not-So) Ancient Proverbs – Astray.

“All human wisdom is summed up in two words; wait and hope.”

Alexander Dumas

“Extreme hopes are born from extreme misery.”

Bertrand Russell

“Beware how you take away hope from another human being.”

Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

“The Wise are silent, the Foolish speak, and the children are, thus, led astray.”

Algernon Blackwood

Ancient Proverbs – 33: Integrity and Manipulation.

“The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use the words. “

~Philip K. Dick

 

“If you don’t give education to people, it is easy to manipulate them.”

~Pele

 

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

~Abraham Lincoln

 

“Integrity is telling myself the truth. And honesty is telling the truth to other people.”

~Spencer Johnson

Ancient Proverbs: 30 – Poetry.

Poetry heals the wounds inflicted by reason.

– Novalis

(Georg Philipp Friedrich Freiherr von Hardenberg)

Ancient Proverbs – 28: Being Without.

A loveless life is a living death.

~ Old English Proverb

What good is honor when you’re starving?

~ Yiddish Proverb

The heaviest weight in the world is an empty pocket.

~ Jewish Proverb

Pleasures are transient, honors are immortal.

~ Greek Proverb

Ancient Proverbs: 27 – Aesop.

“A crust in comfort is better than a feast in fear.”  …

“All of us, the great and the little have need of each other.” …

“One who steals has no right to complain if he is robbed.”   …

“Fine feathers don’t make fine birds.” …          

~Aesop

aesop2Aesop (or the legend of such a man) has survived for centuries without a shred of real evidence regarding his actual life. Nobody knows anything about Aesop to be fact; mainly what we continue to carry of this legacy is nothing more than word of mouth, handed down for generations. (In itself, this is amazing!)
I feel strange quoting someone who may not have even existed, but the words are there despite any argument surrounding Aesop, himself.
He was supposedly a hideously ugly slave who could not even speak upon the beginning of his becoming a fabulist. He was given the gift of storytelling from a priestess of Isis, after doing a nice deed for her out of kindness. Apparently, there was no stopping him after that, and the rest is history. Either way, the wisdom attributed to him are profound and worth passing on, in my opinion.